Indoor volleyball | Sport Photos | Photo Forum

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Indoor volleyball
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April 23, 2015
9:21 am
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I could really use some tips for shooting my granddaughters volleyball games this weekend indoors. I have a Nikon D5200 camera and just bought a Sigma 70 -200mm lens. Could you give me tips on how to set the shutter, ISO and aperture. Thanks in advance

April 27, 2015
3:23 pm
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First of all congratulation on your new lens! 

These would be my settings. 

1) Aperture:  f2.8 or F3.5 (I never tried that Sigma lens, but I read somewhere that f3.5 is sharper at 200mm)

2) Shutter speed: Probably at least 1/320 to frieze the motion. So experimenting with different shutter speed could be a good practice for you. 

3. You have no choice but use higher ISO to get enough light.  It will depends how dark it is there. My guess would be somewhere around 1600 -3200. See what in camera meter tells you. 

Even so it is fast paste, your light should not be changing on volleyball court. I would use manual mode and preset all the setting.

Another thing you can try is to use Auto-ISO. It could be useful if you would like to try to play with different shutter speed without bothering with ISO as well. I personally don’t like anything auto too much, but I think everyone should try different options to find out what works the best for them 

April 27, 2015
5:59 pm
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I agree with Oksana… I shoot a lot of my son’s soccer and 1/320 is a good shutter speed for that, so you may need to go a little higher for volleyball (especially the spikes).  Hopefully the gym is well lit enough that you can shoot with an ISO of 800 or 1600… I think you can really start to tell if you go higher than that.

April 28, 2015
12:02 am
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Hi i started a few months ago with a D3200 with the same problems as you ;)

The lack of light will be your enemy when shooting indoors!
A simple tip for indoor shooting: look of all the lamps are working at the ceiling ;)
These days with all the “green” stuff not all the lamps are working, go ask the manager to put on all lights if possible,this saves you a lot of trouble.

I would prefer F 2.8, at least 1/500 shutter for this kinda sport to avoid blurry pics, and ISO not above 1600.
You can better shoot very dark pictures and brighten them later than put the ISO above 1600, i guess that 3200 is really the max, above 3200 is really killing.

Another thing to keep in mind is the focus mode, i prefer single point centre, since you shooting with high aperture i suggest this setting is the best.
Best is to go early to the match and do some tests, if it gives you confidence shoot some in Sports mode and some in Manual mode.
Another very importing thing is the position where you gonna be, you dont wanna have only the back of players, that is a important thing to keep in mind.

Hopes this helps a bit! :)

June 1, 2015
6:17 am
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Ok anything over 1600 ISO would make the pic noisy. Would that be for just the small prints? If I go up higher on ISO much better light.

June 22, 2015
10:51 am
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Maggie! It is what ever is your comfort zone with noise. It will be more visible on a bigger print. But you can reduce some noise in post. Lightroom for example does a good job. Also it depends on the image. Some images look great with noise. I even add it in post sometimes. The thing is, if I could, I would always use the lowest ISO possible, but if there is no other option, don’t be scared to use higher ISO. 

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