capturing radium paint of night sky at room ceiling. | Night Photos | Photo Forum

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capturing radium paint of night sky at room ceiling.
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June 9, 2013
10:15 pm
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I am trying to capture radium paint fo night sky in my room when all the lights are switched off. When the lights are off the illumination will be green and camera is not able to set focus when I am aiming at room ceiling since it is totally dark. Image is being captured only when flash is on and this makes the image like white . Can any one suggest what is the technique used to capture only the night sky without using flash. Thanks.

June 10, 2013
1:27 pm
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Hello sireesh_y. It sounds like you are trying to take a picture of a room’s ceiling with glow-in-the-dark stars on it — like in this picture. Is this right? If so, here are some general tips that might help.

  1. If the glow-in-the-dark stars are not bright enough, try using a black light to give them a boost!
  2. Use a tripod
  3. Use a cable/wireless remote shutter release (or the timed shutter release)
  4. Compose your scene with the lights on
  5. Focus the lens manually with the lights on
  6. Use manual mode on the camera. Set f-stop to wide open (low numbers) to start with. Set shutter speed to a few seconds. 
  7. Turn off the room lights (keep black light on) and take the shot
  8. Repeat

You may have to play with the f-stop and shutter speed combinations to get the desired amount of glow to appear in your shot. Try zooming in on just one star, then zoom out to get the whole scene. Experiment, have patience, and good luck!

June 10, 2013
6:50 pm
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Excellent advice, James.  I’m looking forward to seeing the result.

Radium is three million times as radioactive as the same mass of uranium.
Thought you should know.

-- Mandrake --

June 11, 2013
5:51 am
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Different type of radiation though…nothing to worry about.

 

Although how are we going to generate the 1.21 Gigawatts of power we need…

June 11, 2013
6:21 am
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Brian Copeland said
nothing to worry about.

 

Tell the Radium Girls that.

 

Back in 60’s the use of Radium Paint was discontinued and replaced with Tritium Paint which also “glows” in the dark, but is less hazardous.
Perhaps the paint on the ceiling is Tritium and not Radium.  The 60’s were awhile ago.

-- Mandrake --

June 11, 2013
8:53 am
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Actually painting things with it, the radium can adsorb into your skin, as well as breathing it in.  This will cause lots of problems.  I believe that radium is only gives off alpha or beta radiation.  Damaging when ingested or in the blood, but to the skin it isn’t.

 

This is based on my memories from being a chemical engineer back in the early 90’s.  My memory is about as reliable as a politician.

July 6, 2013
6:14 pm
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Good directions wattage. Also if you have a hard time focusing manually (some people do), you can always pre auto focus with lights on and then switch to manual, so your focus doesn’t move. 

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