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Did You Know? - Perhaps you didn't.
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March 28, 2014
10:14 am
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Did you Know – Determining the number of shutter activations.

Did you know that if you have a flickr account you can upload an unprocessed jpeg photo to determine the number of your camera’s shutter activations? (I tried a Lightroom processed file and it didn’t work.)

Select your latest uploaded file in your flickr account. At the right where all the camera information is, and near the bottom, you will see “Show all Exif”. Click on that. A long list of additional data is presented. About 2/3 down the list you will find an item labeled “Shutter Count” with the number of activations shown. Easy as that.

Addendum:  In the freely available program “Infran View”, the count is also shown and titled “Total pictures”.
Go to Image>Information and at the bottom click on “EXIF info”. You will find a caption entitled “Total pictures” near the end of the list.  This is the number of shutter activations.

My count is 18,455 and it’s time to have my sensor cleaned as I’ve discovered from my hint below.  Sigh.

I’ll leave this topic open to any other helpful hints that members feel might not be generally known.

-- Mandrake --

March 28, 2014
11:05 am
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Did you Know – Seeing if you have Sensor Dust using Lightroom.

Take a shot of a uniformly colored and textured surface (the sky is good) using a small aperture opening.
Import and bring to the Develop module in Lightroom.
At the top right, second icon from the left, click on the Spot Removal Tool.
At the bottom click on the check box for “visualize spots”.
Slide the slider to the right……….. Ohhhhhh Boy… look at all dem spots.

If your working on cleaning up an image now is the time to use the spot removal tool.
It’s fine to use it in this view with all the spots clearly visible.

dust-1.JPG

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-- Mandrake --

March 28, 2014
11:45 am
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Awesome advise and information.  Thanks a bundle!

March 29, 2014
5:50 am
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As I mentioned in another post, most Nikon camera’s have a sensor self-cleaning function which is accessed through
the Setup Menu.  I performed the self-clean on my camera and took a similar shot as above for comparison.  
Below is the result.  Not all, but a lot of the dust spots were removed.  (The wiggly lines are clouds, not dust.)

It’s also important to note that the spots are much more noticeable when shooting at small apertures; in this case f-22.
I may one day do a test with different aperture settings, but not today.

dust-after-self-cleaning.JPG

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-- Mandrake --

April 12, 2014
9:18 am
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Did you Know – Lightroom Undo and Redo

I think that we all know that the Undo key stroke in Lightroom is Ctrl-Z or Command-Z on the Mac.
Each time this key combination is pressed Lightroom will go back one additional step.

But…. It is less generally know that Ctrl-Shift-Z (Command-Shift-Z for the Mac) is the key stroke for Redo.

There are more complicated ways to go back in time and discussed here.
I really wish there were back and forward arrow icons to click on as in PSE, but there are not.

-- Mandrake --

May 21, 2014
6:24 am
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Did you know – Lightroom Sliders too slippery?

Often in Lightroom I find controlling the amount of an adjustment by using the slider can be less than easy.
By clicking on the value number you can then increase or decrease it’s value by using the up and down arrow keys.
Holding the Shift key down will change the value by larger increments.

-- Mandrake --

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